ELECTRONIC PORTFOLIO
WORKSHOP

©2003, HELEN C. BARRETT, PH.D.

MODULE 1 - INTRODUCTION

MODULE 1.1
Getting Started & Introductions

MODULE 1.2
Literature & Portfolio Planning

MODULE 1.3
Software & Development Process

MODULE 1.4
Developing the Digital Archive

MODULE 1.5
Reflection & Evaluation

MODULE 1.6
Tools - PowerPoint

MODULE 1.1

GETTING STARTED & INTRODUCTIONS

Welcome to this workshopon creating electronic portfolios using common software tools. Dr. Helen Barrett has designed this workshop around her five stages of electronic portfolio development, allowing you to sample a variety of tools and strategies for publishing a portfolio in electronic format. This first module will allow you to make some initial decisions about what kind of electronic portfolio that you will develop, and build an initial portfolio using common software tools (Microsoft Word and Excel).

You will need to have the following software for this first Module: Adobe Acrobat Reader, QuickTime Player, and Microsoft Office (Word and Excel). The only textbook for this workshop is Dr. Barrett's CD-ROM, Standards-Based Electronic Portfolios plus access to the World Wide Web.

In this section, your workshop participantsd will get to know each other through discussions. You will look at sample electronic portfolios, both on the CD-ROM and on the WWW. You will also discuss the role of portfolios in different professions today.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Web or CD Activities: (links below on Dr. Barrett's website) Optional readings are for those taking the course for graduate credit.

4. Discussions:

5. Participant Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.2

Literature on Portfolio Development, Standards and Portfolios, Planning

In this section, we will look at the literature on portfolio development, the different purposes for portfolios, the role of standards in assessment portfolios, and begin your own planning process. There is a planning worksheet on the CD in Word format that you will use to guide your planning. After the first video clip, begin working on your personal plan. We will discuss the use of portfolios at different age levels and then will address your personal plans and how we can help each other.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Web or CD Activities: Optional readings are for those taking the workshop for credit.

4. Discussions:

There should be two parts to your discussion: Specific and General. There are some examples of electronic portfolios in the Sample Portfolios folder on the course CD. There are also weblinks to many examples of portfolios on the Wichita State Education Department page and in the External Links. Pick at least two different types of portfolios to review and discuss them in terms of both purpose and technology.

Then, from the slide show for this section, the sample portfolios on the website and your experience, discuss (in general) the role of portfolios that support today's standards-driven education system. Dr. Ken Wolf talks about three major purposes for portfolios: learning, assessment and employment. Discuss what you think are the similarities and differences between these three types of portfolios, both in terms of content and audience. Dr. Mary Diez talks about the three metaphors for thinking about portfolios: mirror, map and sonnet. How do these metaphors help your understanding of how portfolios can be used in education?

5. Participant Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.3

Selecting Appropriate Software & Stages of EP Development
Stage 2: Archive Creation/Digital Conversion

In this section, we will address Dr. Barrett's "5-by-5 Model" of electronic portfolio development which covers both the stages of electronic portfolio development as well as five levels of software, depending on ease of use. There are two basic directions in creating electronic portfolios: using a web-based data base (either commercial or developed by an educational organization) -- a customized systems approach (CS); or the use of common software tools to create an electronic portfolio -- generic tool (GT). This workshop covers the variety of generic tools that can be used to create electronic portfolios, and will guide you through the process of selecting which software tools best meet your needs.

Now that you have determined the purpose and audience for the portfolio you want to create, it is time to start collecting the digital artifacts and figuring out where you will store the artifacts. Our activities over the next two modules will focus on Stage 2, Developing the Digital Archive (Archive Creation and Digital Conversion). You will look at issues of digital storage and where you will store your working portfolio. You probably already have a lot of your documents in digital form, if you created many of them with a word processor or other software.

You may need to build skills in digitizing images (we will address audio and video in a later module). You will need to have access to some type of graphics editor to do simple graphic manipulation. You might have access to some of the Adobe graphics products (Photoshop, Photoshop Elements, or Photo Deluxe). The shareware program Graphic Converter is supplied on the CD for Macintosh OS9 with links to download a similar version for Windows users.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities for this week and next week)

3. Web or CD Activities:

Resources for hands-on activities: (Review only if you need help in each area)

4. Discussion:

5. Participant Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.4

Stage 2: Archive Creation/Digital Conversion
Creating the Portfolio Production Documents

In this section, we will discuss the different types of artifacts that you can collect, and the types of media that best convey the story of your portfolio. A resume is also an important part of a portfolio. Include your resume in your archive; if you don't have one, use the Wizard or Templates in Microsoft Word to create your resume.

The electronic portfolio that we will create requires two organizing documents: our collection of artifacts and our reflections on meeting our outcomes, goals or standards. We will begin to work on creating a list of our artifacts, using Excel. We will create the frameword for our Reflective Portfolio using Word. An explanation of the Excel and Word documents can be found online. There are screen recording videos on the CD where I show you how to use these tools. If you can't figure out what the print instructions mean, look for RED boxes in the text of the Handbook. Clicking on those boxes will play the video clips.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Web or CD Activity:

Resources for hands-on activities

4. Discussion:

"Portfolios tell a story...put in anything that helps to tell that story." (Paulson & Paulson) What types of media best tell the story that you want to tell with your portfolio? Text? Images? Audio? Video? What kind of artifacts do you want to include in your portfolio? Focus your discussion on the type of media that best demonstrates the outcome, goal or standard that you are trying to demonstrate with the portfolio that you are creating. Look for congruence between your portfolio purpose and the type of media you are interested in including.

This workshop covers the variety of generic software tools that can be used to create electronic portfolios, and will guide you through the process of selecting which software tools best meet your needs. Between this module and the next one, we will have an opportunity to "try on" different software tools. After reviewing Dr. Barrett's article called, "Make your own Electronic Portfolio" (LLwTApr00.pdf), discuss the type of software you feel comfortable using to produce electronic portfolios in your own situation. Also refer to Dr. Barrett's "5-by-5 Model" that is based on the 5 stages and the levels based on "ease of use" of the software.

5. Participant Progress check-list:

Were you able to finish the planning worksheet? Have you read other plans in the group and given them some feedback and helpful suggestions? Have you figured out what type of media you want to use in your portfolios? Do you have a good idea of the type of technology you need to support the type of media you have selected?

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MODULE 1.5

Stage 3: Reflective Portfolio, Captions

In this section, we will begin to look at reflection, and the important role of reflection in meeting the purpose you have chosen for your portfolio. We will create captions for each of the artifacts in your portfolio.

In science, reflection is a bending back of light on itself. A mirror image is enough like the original so as to be recognizable, but sufficiently different to cause one to examine the familiar from a new perspective. (Tuchon, 1999)

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Web or CD Activity:

4. Discussion:

5. Progress check-list:

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MODULE 1.6

Tools - PowerPoint and Stage 4

In this section, we will address the pros and cons of using Microsoft Office tools, with a focus on PowerPoint.

1. In this module we will learn about: (Objectives)

2. We will: (Activities)

3. Web or CD Activity:

Resources for hands-on activities

4. Discussion:

5. Participant progress check-list:

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©2003, Helen C. Barrett, Ph.D.